Saturday, November 5, 2016

Tips for Authors Using Twitter from Writer's Edit

Click here to watch the video.
Advice from Writer's Edit

What makes a great Twitter profile for a writer?

  • Represent your author brand accurately and professionally.
  • Use your real author name, so you're easy to find and follow!
  • Use a real (and respectable) photo of yourself for your profile picture.
  • Write a simple and direct bio. Feel free to list what you'll be tweeting about.
  • Use the 'Pinned Tweet' feature to link to your latest blog post or published work.

What should you tweet about?

  • Writing and industry-related news/feature articles.
  • Helpful, resourceful tweets - direct your followers to articles by other writers that you found helpful or inspiring.
  • Motivational images/quotes.
  • Make sure your tweets contribute to the writing community on Twitter.
  • Don't be all about self-promotion (asking people to buy your book).

How to use hashtags, and what hashtags should you use?

  • Be sure to change the hashtags you're using according to what you're tweeting about.
  • Don't use sentences in hashtags.
  • Check out the tool Hashtagify, which acts as a "search engine" for hashtags, explores the latest trends and related hashtag terms.

Should you use images on Twitter?

  • Keep your images basic and easy to view (and read, if they're quotes), nothing too busy!
  • Get the dimensions right (the width should be double the height).
  • Use Canva for image creation, as they provide you with the correct dimensions from the beginning, and offer super easy design features.

How often should you tweet?

  • Remember that the lifetime of a tweet is just 5 minutes.
  • You can tweet as often as you like, as long as it doesn't take you away from other responsibilities and writing!
  • Use Buffer.com to schedule tweets to go live, which means you don't have to be on Twitter all the time!

Common mistakes writers make on Twitter:

  • Getting too obscure and creative with their tweets.
  • Not using simple language.
  • Using superfluous words and taking up prime 'tweet real estate'.
  • Using too many hashtags (3 at most).
  • Using silly hashtags (sentence long hashtags, like we do when we speak).
  • Being negative - don't whinge all the time!
  • Trying too hard to promote and sell their book.

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